Introduction to Musicianship
Introduction to musicianship through in-depth exploration of basic common musical elements and training in aural recognition, sight singing, dictation, and keyboard skills. Focus on topics such as tonal and modal harmony, rhythm, improvisation, composition, notation, and ear training to prepare students for later theory courses, participation in music ensembles, advanced study in music, and professional careers.
Theory: species counterpoint through fifth species; description of triads and inversions.
Theory: diatonic harmony through secondary dominants and diminished sevenths; modulations to dominant and relative keys; writing of four-part chorales; style composition in baroque dance forms; introduction to figured bass notation.
Theory: chromatic harmony including development of tonality, 1800 to 1850; appropriate analysis and style composition.
Theory: baroque counterpoint including chorale prelude; twopart invention; exposition and first modulation of three-part invention; canonic principles; analysis of inventions, canons, and fugues. Musicianship: sightsinging of extended chromatic melodies; advanced harmonic dictation (diatonic and chromatic); keyboard harmonization of modulating melodies; elementary score reading.
Theory: advanced chromatic harmony including development of harmony from 1850; analytical projects; style composition. Musicianship: advanced score reading; advanced harmonic dictation; preparation for departmental examination.
20th-century harmonic language, including nonfunctional harmony, polytonality, free atonality, serialism, and minimalism.
Introduction to music education by development of concepts, attitudes, and skills necessary to teach music and philosophical, historical, cultural, and psychological foundations of music education, with emphasis on learning theories and psychology of music learning. Contextualization of concepts by engaging in non-notational modes of music learning, including systematic aural transmission and informal learning.
Preparation of students for teaching music at preschool and elementary school levels. Development of understanding of developmental characteristics, diverse cultures, and learning needs of children and design of effective instructional strategies that are age-appropriate and responsive to children’s background. Focus on practice of student-centered curriculum where students are active learners and teachers are facilitators to become proficient in providing children with music learning environment that is conducive to optimal growth in their musicality and creativity.
Preparation of students for teaching choral music at middle and high school levels. Development of understanding of developmental characteristics, diverse cultures, and learning needs of adolescents and design of effective instructional strategies that are age-appropriate and responsive to students’ background. Diverse practices and learning processes in choral music of American and the world serve as basis of comparative study, with emphasis on comprehensive music education through performance.
Critical study and analysis of philosophy, history, organization, curriculum, and literature of music programs for elementary and secondary instrumental music instruction in traditional and nontraditional settings. Development of strategies and techniques to teach music in group settings.
Applied studies in basic performance techniques and tutorial materials: High strings.
Applied studies in basic performance techniques and tutorial materials: Low strings.
Applied studies in basic performance techniques and tutorial materials designed to give music education students knowledge to teach basic instrument concepts: Woodwinds
Applied studies in basic performance techniques and tutorial materials designed to give music education students knowledge to teach basic instrument concepts: Brass
Fundamentals of conducting, including basic skills, techniques, analysis, and repertoire.
Study and practice of conducting both instrumental and choral repertoire. In addition to further development of conducting gestures, focus on score study techniques, rehearsal techniques, style, and interpretation as applied to choral and instrumental repertoire.
Introduction to art of teaching voice, including anatomy of singing instrument, biomechanics of singing, diagnosis and correction of faults, health and care of voice, and instructional techniques. Application of vocal techniques to choral music teaching at middle and high school levels.
Applied studies in basic performance techniques and tutorial materials designed to give music education students knowledge to teach essential instrument concepts. Topics include snare drum technique, mallets, timpani, accessories, percussion ensembles, introduction to drum set and world percussion.
Foundations for teaching jazz by development of understanding of curriculum, rehearsal techniques, improvisation, and uses of technology in jazz education. Technology understanding includes basic concepts of sequencing, composition, ensemble performance, and creation of multimedia presentations using tablet (iPad) technology.
Survey of Western music; examination of representative compositions within their cultural contexts and development of analytical methods appropriate to each repertory. A: To 1700. B: 1700 - 1890. C: 1890 to Present.
Music Education majors enroll in individual instruction on their primary instrument or voice for 9 quarters.
Music Education majors participate in Music Department performance ensembles for at least 9 quarters. Learn more about the performance ensembles.
Teaching/learning process as applied to personal and community health. Topics include psychoactive drugs (alcohol, tobacco, and narcotics), human sexuality, nutrition, community health resources, and analysis of state’s health framework. (Required only for Music Education majors electing to earn the Teaching Credential.)
Site-based fieldwork. Students are assigned to school sites with racially, culturally, and linguistically diverse student populations. Throughout observation and participation period, students analyze effective strategies for achieving learning for all students, including sociocultural approaches and appropriate use of educational technology. (Required only for Music Education majors electing to earn the Teaching Credential.)
Site-based fieldwork. Students are assigned to student teach in designated school sites with racially, culturally, and linguistically diverse student populations. Throughout student teaching period, students as novice teachers plan, implement, and assess daily lessons and units, as well as actively engage in reflecting on issues specific to school/community relations. (Required only for Music Education majors electing to earn the Teaching Credential.)
Analysis of basic principles and concepts of planning, conducting, and evaluating units of curriculum and instruction. Emphasis on study and utilization of constructivist strategies and their application in elementary and secondary schools. Examination of different methods of computer literacy and teaching subject matter. Students may conduct ethnographic inquiry of local community of their designated partnership district. (Required only for Music Education majors electing to earn the Teaching Credential.)
Learning about urban communities by critically examining students’ own beliefs, assumptions, and experiences about them to deepen understanding and appreciation of urban communities. (Required only for Music Education majors electing to earn the Teaching Credential.)
Examination and reflection on student values, beliefs, assumptions, and lives to determine how these factors shape the way students view their world and, in particular, teaching, learning, students, their families, and their neighborhoods and communities. (Required only for Music Education majors electing to earn the Teaching Credential.)
Exploration of interrelationships among families, communities, and school systems, engaging parents, caregivers, guardians, students, and school personnel to develop strategies for working with families and to develop philosophy of education. (Required only for Music Education majors electing to earn the Teaching Credential.)
Intensive consideration of American society, particularly its racial and cultural diversity. Topics include historical development of American society, manifestations of cultures, and ways to learn about students’ cultures. Examination of issues of racism, ethnic and gender differences, perspectives of cultural diversity, and impact on educational and classroom instruction. (Required only for Music Education majors electing to earn the Teaching Credential.)
Theoretical foundations of language structure and first and second language acquisition, with focus on major themes of current research that provide framework for schooling of English language learners. Rationale for bilingual/English language acquisition and development programs. Historical and current theories and models of language. (Required only for Music Education majors electing to earn the Teaching Credential.)
Approaches for teaching exceptional individuals in special and regular education programs. Principles and assumptions underlying alternative approaches. Emphasis on individualizing curriculum and classroom management. (Required only for Music Education majors electing to earn the Teaching Credential.)
Preparation for educators to teach K-12 students to explore their relationships with media by critically questioning media representations and creating their own alternative media messages. Critical media literacy combines theoretical foundations of cultural studies and critical pedagogy with practical classroom applications of new digital media as well as traditional print-based means of communication. Exploration of media representations of race, class, gender, sexual orientation, and other identity markers. Educators critically question media and technology, as well as explore new alternatives for creating multimedia messages in their own classrooms. Analysis and creation of media projects related to teaching required. (Required only for Music Education majors electing to earn the Teaching Credential.)

Elective Courses

See course details in the UCLA Course Catalog
See course details in the UCLA Course Catalog
See course details in the UCLA Course Catalog
Students may select additional elective courses from other departments and programs within the school of music.
Guided Field Experiences in Music Education
Initial field experiences for students preparing to teach and earn single subject certification in music. Novice teachers work under direct guidance of UCLA music education faculty members and practicing public school instructor to develop and deliver instruction in K-12 settings.
Development of piano skills and competencies that enable students to function successfully in general music, instrumental ensemble, and choral ensemble classrooms.

Explore Other Degrees

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Graduate study and training in choral, orchestral, or wind conducting
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Mentorship in the creation and realization of music for concerts, opera, and visual media
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Music Performance Jazz
A highly selective M.M. program in partnership with the Herbie Hancock Institute of Jazz