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Nov 1 Fri
7:00pm
Free

Concert: Publishing the Archive—The Ethnomusicology Archive/Adam Matthew Digital Project of 2019

world-music
Recording Studio – Room 165 – Evelyn and Mo Ostin Music Center Watch Livestream

Hear the collection come to life in a concert featuring Pakaraguian Kulintang Ensemble of Southern California and other instruments highlighted in the Adam Matthew Digital Project.

To mark this year's UNESCO-designated World Day for Audiovisual Heritage, UCLA's World Music Center is celebrating the fruition of a multi-year partnership between the Ethnomusicology Archive and British publisher Adam Matthew Digital. This collaboration now makes sixty major field collections held by the Archive publicly accessible online, along with demonstrations of instruments from our World Musical Instrument Collection. Come for an afternoon and evening of lectures, workshops, and performances related to the Adam Matthew project, with featured guest speaker Anthony Seeger, Emeritus Distinguished Professor (UCLA) and Emeritus Director of Smithsonian Folkways Recordings.

Please note: The concert and symposium have separate RSVPs, so if you would like to attend the symposium, please click this link: RSVP

(Scroll down to RSVP for the concert via Eventbrite)

Register in advance for this event. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the event.

Ticketing

This event is FREE! Let us know you’ll be coming by RSVP.

PARKING

Self-service parking is available at UCLA’s Parking Structure #2 for events in Schoenberg Music Building and the Evelyn and Mo Ostin Music Center. Costs range from $1 for 20 minutes to $20 all day. Learn more about campus parking.

ACCESSIBILITY

The UCLA Herb Alpert School of Music is eager to provide a variety of accommodations and services for access and communications. If you would like to request accommodations, please do so 10 days in advance of the event by emailing ADA@schoolofmusic.ucla.edu or calling (310) 825-0174.

PHOTOGRAPHY

The UCLA Herb Alpert School of Music welcomes visitors to take non‐flash, personal‐use photography except where noted. Share your images with us @UCLAalpert / #UCLAalpert on Twitter + Instagram + Facebook

FOOD & DRINK

Food and drink may not be carried into the theaters. Thank you!

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