Current Student

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Musicology

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James Ace
James Ace

James Ace is a Ph.D. student in UCLA’s Department of Musicology, having previously earned a Master’s degree in Music History and Literature from the University of Maryland, College Park (2017), and a Bachelor of Music degree in viola performance from Florida State University (2015). His primary research looks at American musical entertainment of the mid-late nineteenth century in resonance with contemporary cultural and scientific formations of race, sex, and gender. James is also actively involved in a project that deals with sound, phenomenological approaches to embodiment, and martial arts. He is particularly interested in historical constructions of gender, and approaches to scholarship informed by transgender perspectives. James has also worked extensively on archival projects: as an archivist in the Special Collections in Performing Arts at the University of Maryland, and as a graduate student researcher for the Lowell Milken Fund for American Jewish Music working in collaboration with Sinai Temple in Westwood.

Patrick Bonczyk
Patrick Bonczyk

Patrick Bonczyk is a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Musicology and also holds a Graduate Certificate in Early Modern Studies from UCLA’s Center for 17th- and 18th-Century Studies. He studies early modern androids and keyboards, instrument making and pedagogy, and animal collection addressing the tenuous boundaries that separate humans, animals, and machines. Patrick has presented papers at conferences of the Center for Renaissance Studies at the Newberry Library, the Biennial International Conference on Baroque Music at the Mozarteum, and the Society for Seventeenth-Century Music where he received the 2013 Irene Alm Memorial Prize. A countertenor, he has sung at Vancouver Early Music’s Baroque Vocal Programme and the Baroque Academy at the Amherst Early Music Festival. Patrick combines his commitment to teaching writing across the disciplines with a Graduate Certificate in Writing Pedagogy and as an Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Fellow of the Excellence in Pedagogy and Innovate Classrooms Program (EPIC). Since 2017, he has served as the Teaching Assistant Coordinator for Writing II in UCLA’s Writing Programs. Passionate about inclusivity, equity, and anti-racist pedagogy, he is an Andrew W. Mellon Foundation EPIC Fellow in “Inclusive Classrooms” and leads workshops on inclusivity, lesson planning, and student learning for UCLA’s Center for the Advancement of Teaching. 

Kerry Brunson
Kerry Brunson

Kerry Brunson is a PhD student in UCLA’s Department of Musicology. She received a BM in Saxophone Performance from Kennesaw State University (2009) and a MA in Musicology from California State University, Long Beach (2016). Her research centers on Classical music institutions, urbanization, and regional politics in the US South with a focus on post-war Atlanta. She has presented her work at conferences in the United States and Europe, including for the American Musicological Society, the Society for American Music, and Music and the Moving Image. She is currently serving as Editor-in-Chief for ECHO: A Music-Centered Journal and was co-coordinator for the department’s 2017-18 Distinguished Lecture Series.

Additionally, Kerry is a docent for grades K-12 at the Getty Center in Los Angeles where she crafts and leads interactive musical tours of the museum’s galleries. She is also an active musician who enjoys singing and playing the oboe, English horn, and saxophone with an eclectic mix of local bands and orchestras.

Caitlin Carlos
Caitlin Carlos

Caitlin Carlos is a PhD candidate in musicology at UCLA.  She received her M.A. in Historical Musicology from the University of Southern California in 2014.  She also earned an M.M. in Vocal Performance from the University of Redlands in 2011 and a Bachelors of Music degree in Vocal Performance from Chapman University in 2009. She is a recipient of the Pauley and Mellon Fellowships at UCLA, as well as the Graduate Research Mentorship Fellowship.  Caitlin received the Ciro Zoppo Graduate Student Award in 2018. Her current research interests include nostalgia and cultural memory in rock music from the late 1960s and early 1970s.  Her dissertation “Rock and Roll Fantasy: Dreaming of the Past in Early Seventies Rock” explores nostalgia and fantasy spaces as an avenue for social critique, as well as expressions of contemporary values.

Sarah Davachi
Sarah Davachi

Sarah Davachi holds a bachelor’s degree in philosophy from the University of Calgary and a master’s degree in electronic music and recording media from Mills College, and is currently a doctoral student in musicology at UCLA. Her primary research focuses on aspects of experimentalism, organology, phenomenology and hermeneutics, and archival study. She is particularly interested in articulating the influence of musical instruments on the creation and reception of music, both from idiosyncratic and affective perspectives. Additional areas of interest include early music, especially in relation to the exploration of temperament in the Renaissance, popular music and recording practices, and the correspondence between physical space and acoustic experience. In addition to her scholarly work, Davachi is also an active composer-performer of electroacoustic music and has toured extensively across the globe in support of her recorded output. She employs numerous sound sources including synthesizer, piano, pipe organ, electric organ, strings, and woodwinds.

Wade Dean
Wade Dean

Wade F. Dean is a Eugene V. Cota Robles Fellow and PhD candidate in the department of Musicology at the University of California Los Angeles. His work explores the interplay between Black vernacular music, popular and socio-political culture. Dean is completing a dissertation that analyzes mid-twentieth century live soul performances and their role in realizing, describing, and enacting alternative socio-political formations and futures within Black life.

Erin Fitzpatrick
Erin Fitzpatrick

Erin Fitzpatrick, a Ph.D. student in UCLA’s Department of Musicology, previously earned her Bachelor of Arts degree in Music and Culture from Bowdoin College in 2015. A New Jersey native with the Springsteen-style Telecaster to prove it, Erin’s primary research concerns the interactions between (electric) guitars, “gear,” gender, and bodies, with specific interest in exploring questions of materiality and performance practice in post-1980 punk, indie, and art rock. She is personally invested in considering these topics from queer, interdisciplinary perspectives and adding invisible faces to rock music narratives. Other projects underway include questions of intimacy, eroticism, and “ASMR”; as well as sonic racial profiling, protest, and police violence. Erin is also an active songwriter, guitarist, and producer. Her Los Angeles band, Erin Anne, will release their debut album in Spring 2019.

Alex Hallenbeck
Alex Hallenbeck

Alex Hallenbeck entered UCLA’s musicology department in Fall 2016, having previously received an MA in musicology from Indiana University (2016) and a BA in music from Cornell University (2013). Alex’s research encompasses a wide array of topics from the 20th and 21st centuries, often examining both the interrelation of musical ontology and meaning and issues in heterosexuality and masculinity. Current projects range from the gendered discourse of Charles Ives to the music of Frank Zappa and Ariana Grande. Alex’s research has been presented at conferences in multiple countries, including IASPM-Canada and a conference on new approaches to musical transcription at the University of Cambridge. He was also an Ingolf Dahl finalist at the joint meeting of the AMS Northern California/Pacific Southwest chapters in 2017. In addition to his research, Alex is currently involved as a co-coordinator for the department’s Distinguished Lecture Series.

Hyeonjin Park
Hyeonjin Park

Hyeonjin Park is a Ph.D. student in the Department of Musicology at UCLA. Previously, they completed a M.A. in Music at the University of Bristol as a Fulbright Scholar, and a B.A. in English Literature and Music at Mount Holyoke College. Their interdisciplinary research explores player engagement with music and sound in video games within a sociocultural framework. Additional research interests include music, sound, and nostalgia; media studies; and the formation of identity through music and sound. Hyeonjin is actively involved in the ludomusicology community.

Danielle Stein
Danielle Stein

Danielle Stein is a Ph.D. student in the Department of Musicology at the University of California, Los Angeles, where she has co-coordinated the Musicology Distinguished Lecture Series and served as Managing Editor of ECHO: A Music Centered Journal. She holds a M.A. in Musicology from UCLA, a M.M. in Voice Performance and Opera Studies from California State University Northridge, and a B.M. in Voice Performance and Education from San Diego State University. Her primary research examines World War II propaganda music, the covert musical operations of the Office of Strategic Services and the Central Intelligence Agency, and the development of weaponized music and sonic environments over the 20th and 21st centuries. Courses taught at UCLA include Music and Politics, Music as Political Instrument in the Sixties, Film and Music; courses assisted have included Popular Jewish and Israeli Music. Danielle has presented papers at the national conferences for the American Musicological Society, Society for American Music, and the International Association for the Study of Popular Music, as well as at the Wagner 1900 Conference at the University of Oxford and the Transnational Opera Studies Conference at the University of Bern. She is the recipient of the American Musicological Society’s Ingolf Dahl Memorial award in musicology for her paper “The Office of Strategic Services Musac Project: ‘Lili Marleen,’ Marlene Dietrich, and the Propaganda Music of WWII,” and her research has received support from the Milken Foundation for Jewish Music, the Ciro Zoppo Research Fellowship, the UCLA Graduate Research Mentorship Program, and the University of California Del Amo Fellowship. Also a soprano, former USO performer, and an avid community arts producer, Danielle maintains a private voice studio in Hollywood and serves as the Assistant Artistic Director and Vice President of the Celestial Opera Company, is a co-founder of the California Music Collective, and serves on the board of the Émigré Composers Orchestra.