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Feb 26 Fri
9:00am
Free

Music Performance Studies Today: “Performing Capitalism and Neoliberalism”

Music Performance Studies Today
lectures-symposia
Zoom

Across time and place, the arts have been heralded as a savior of all sorts; from promises of class mobility through creative freedom, to neocolonialist narratives about rescuing “troubled” youth, to the ability to turn passion into productive labor. Through historic and contemporary case studies, this panel explores how musical creativity and philanthropy have been called upon to invite upward mobility since the 19th century.

This is the first event in the Music Performance Studies Today series. Considering musics from a variety of traditions, this symposium aims to bring visibility to the field of music performance studies and generate scholarly momentum in its realm at UCLA.

Click here to visit the Symposium Website

Panelists

Catherine Provenzano (UCLA)
John Pippen (Colorado State University)
Izabela Wagner (Collegium Civitas Cooperative University in Warsaw)
Mina Yang (Minerva Schools at KGI)

Co-Respondents

Timothy Taylor (UCLA), Anna Morcom (UCLA)

Event Co-Sponsors

UCLA Music Library
UCLA Center for Musical Humanities and the Joyce S. and Robert U. Nelson Fund
UCLA Arts Initiative
UCLA Center for Performance Studies
UCLA Department of Musicology
American Society for Theatre Research

This program is made possible by the Joyce S. and Robert U. Nelson Fund. Robert Uriel Nelson was a revered musicologist and music professor at UCLA, who, together with his wife, established a generous endowment for the university to make programs like this possible.

Register in advance for this event. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the event.

Attending this Program?

ACCESSIBILITY

The UCLA Herb Alpert School of Music is eager to provide a variety of accommodations and services for access and communications. If you would like to request accommodations, please do so 10 days in advance of the event by emailing ADA@schoolofmusic.ucla.edu or calling (310) 825-0174.

Acknowledgment

The UCLA Herb Alpert School of Music acknowledges the Gabrielino/Tongva peoples as the traditional land caretakers of Tovaangar (the Los Angeles basin and So. Channel Islands). As a land grant institution, we pay our respects to the Honuukvetam (Ancestors), ‘Ahiihirom (Elders) and ‘Eyoohiinkem (our relatives/relations) past, present and emerging.

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Zoom
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Zoom
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Free
classical
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Online
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6:00pm
Free
classical
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Online
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9:00am
Free
lectures-symposia
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Zoom