Music Performance

Studies Today:

a program of online events, 2021

 

Image credit: Unsplash, Spencer Imbrock

Music Performance Studies Today
Bringing together dynamic approaches to innovative research<br />
Bringing together dynamic approaches to innovative research

Considering musics from a variety of traditions, our symposium, entitled “Music Performance Studies Today,” aims to bring visibility to the field of music performance studies and generate scholarly momentum in its realm at UCLA. To stimulate productive conversations, the symposium draws together researchers working diversely with and on praxis- and theoretically-based modes of investigation. The UCLA Herb Alpert School of Music is perfectly positioned to become the epicenter of Music Performance Studies in the Western Hemisphere given its renowned departments and subdivisions of Musicology, Ethnomusicology, Composition, Music Education, Global Jazz Studies, Music Industry, Music Performance, and newly minted Music Performance Studies. Scholars and artists working in these areas have much to learn from one another; conversation between them is vital to the development of core methodologies and dynamic approaches to innovative research.

Presented by the UCLA Center for Musical Humanities and the UCLA Music Library, in collaboration with co-organizers Pheaross Graham (UCLA) and Farrah O’Shea (UCLA).

Schedule of Events at a Glance

“Performing Capitalism and Neoliberalism”
February 26, 2021
Zoom, 9am-11:30am PST
  • Panelists: Catherine Provenzano (UCLA), John Pippen (Colorado State University), Izabela Wagner (Collegium Civitas Cooperative University in Warsaw), Mina Yang (Minerva Schools at Keck Graduate Institute)
  • Co-Respondents: Tim Taylor (UCLA), Anna Morcom (UCLA)
  • Link to Registration
“Anti-Blackness in Western Classical Music”
March 5, 2021
Zoom, 9am-12:10pm PST
  • Panelists: Philip Ewell (Hunter College of the City University of New York), Darryl Taylor (African American Art Song Alliance), Lucy Caplan (Harvard University), Christopher Jenkins (Oberlin University), Michelle Cann (Curtis Institute)
  • Co-Respondents: Pheaross Graham (UCLA) and Farrah O’Shea (UCLA)
  • Link to Registration
"On Beethoven, Blackness, and Belonging: Debating Classical Music in the Black Atlantic"
March 5, 2021
Zoom, 4pm-5:30pm PST
  • The UCLA Robert U. Nelson Lecture Series, hosted by the Center for Musical Humanities, presents a talk by Dr. Kira Thurman, “On Beethoven, Blackness, and Belonging: Debating Classical Music in the Black Atlantic.”
  • Co-Respondents: Pheaross Graham (UCLA) and Farrah O’Shea (UCLA)
  • Link to Registration

 

 

“The Ephemerality of Musical Hearing”
March 8, 2021
Zoom, 9am-11:30am PST
  • Panelists: Elisabeth Le Guin (UCLA), Ryan Shiotsuki (Chapman University, Cal Poly Pomona), Nina Eidsheim (UCLA), Andrea Moore (Smith College)
  • Co-Respondents: Elizabeth Upton (UCLA), Mark Kligman (UCLA)
  • Link to Registration
Watch Party for “21st-Century Pianism: Retrospection, New Directions, and Interpretative Communities”
April 28, 2021
YouTube, 4pm PST
  • Musical presentations: Luca Chiantore (Universidade de Aveiro INET-md), Mine Doğantan-Dack (Ensemble Luce), Pheaross Graham (UCLA), John Rink (University of Cambridge), William Kinderman (UCLA)
  • Link to livestream forthcoming
“21st-Century Pianism: Retrospection, New Directions, and Interpretative Communities”
April 30, 2021
Zoom, 9am-11:30am PST
  • Panelists: Luca Chiantore (Universidade de Aveiro INET-md), Mine Doğantan-Dack (Ensemble Luce), Pheaross Graham (UCLA), John Rink (University of Cambridge), William Kinderman (UCLA)
  • Link to Registration
“Methods in Music Performance Studies”
May 14, 2021
Zoom, 9am-11:30am PST
  • Panelists: Amy Bauer (UCI), Roshanak Kheshti (UCSD), Alejandro L. Madrid (Cornell University), Richard Pettengill (Lake Forest College)
  • Co-Respondents: Mitchell Morris (UCLA), Farrah O’Shea (UCLA)
  • Link to Registration
“Performance, Gestures, Electronics”
May 21, 2021
Zoom, 1pm-3:30pm PST
  • Panelists: Jocelyn Ho (UCLA), Margaret Schedel (Stony Brook University), Patricia Alessandrini (Stanford University), Pamela Z
  • This session includes a performance of “Women’s Labor” by Jocelyn Ho and a panel discussion
  • Link to Registration

Symposium Description

Broadly focusing on music since 1800, “Music Performance Studies Today” will feature a number of approaches spanning from examinations of microscopic performance details to proposing macro, overarching, and generalizable theories of performance. In building bridges, the symposium will inspire collaborations through performances of music discussed by the invited speakers, as well as stage-related musical demonstrations. In building a scholarly community bringing together performers and academics alike, the symposium sets out to illume methods for performance analysis at many levels, including music score interaction, connections to experience, and reflections on culture. Simultaneously, it aspires to reach out to the larger Los Angeles community through associated performances catering to a variety of interests.

Performing Capitalism and Neoliberalism

February 26, 2021, 9AM-11:30AM PST

Across time and place, the arts have been heralded as a savior of all sorts; from promises of class mobility through creative freedom, to neocolonialist narratives about rescuing “troubled” youth, to the ability to turn passion into productive labor. Through historic and contemporary case studies, this panel explores how musical creativity and philanthropy have been called upon to invite upward mobility since the 19th century.

Have Questions? Contact:

Holley Replogle-Wong

Panelists and Presentation titles
  • Catherine Provenzano (UCLA), “MIDI Packs, Chord Organs, and Autoharps: Easy Playing Instruments and Classes of Musical Participation”
  • John Pippen (Colorado State University) “New Music’s (Non)Laborious Frame: Creating Value in Rehearsals and Social Media”
  • Izabela Wagner (Collegium Civitas Cooperative University in Warsaw), “Virtuoso Careers: An extreme case study of performing capitalism and neoliberalism – a dynamic story”
  • Mina Yang (Minerva at KGI) (Minerva Schools at Keck Graduate Institute) “The LA Phil in Inglewood: Neoliberal Philanthropy, Starchitecture, and Classical Music in the Beckmen YOLA Center”
Co-Respondents
  • Tim Taylor (UCLA), Anna Morcom (UCLA)
Link to Presentation Abstracts (PDF)
Link to Presentation Abstracts (PDF)
Link to Presentation Abstracts (PDF)

Anti-Blackness in Western Classical Music

March 5, 2021, 9AM-12:10pm PST

This panel moves with the current momentum of Black Lives Matter demonstrations and recent conversations considering whiteness in music theory to consider aspects of the panel extend to identifying issues and frames in classical performance, such as biased listening, pedagogy, minuscule representation of concert artists, long-term outcomes of black classical musicians, treatment, and ethics.

Have Questions? Contact:

Holley Replogle-Wong

Panelists and Presentation titles
  • Philip Ewell (Hunter College of the City University of New York), “On Confronting Music Theory’s Antiblackness”
  • Darryl Taylor (African American Art Song Alliance), “African American Art Song Advocacy”
  • Lucy Caplan (Harvard University), “‘The Art of Lynching’: Race, Violence, and the Modern American Opera House”
  • Christopher Jenkins (Oberlin University), “Aesthetic Alienation: The Effect of Racialized Aesthetics on Conservatory Environments”
  • Michelle Cann (Curtis Institute), “Interview with Michelle Cann, Sokoloff Chair of Piano Studies at The Curtis Institute”
Co-Respondents
  • Pheaross Graham (UCLA) and Farrah O’Shea (UCLA)
Link to Presentation Abstracts (PDF)
Link to Presentation Abstracts (PDF)
Link to Presentation Abstracts (PDF)

"On Beethoven, Blackness, and Belonging: Debating Classical Music in the Black Atlantic"

March 5, 2021, 4pm-5:30pm PST
4th Annual robert U. Nelson Lecture Series

 

Have Questions? Contact:

Holley Replogle-Wong

4th Annual Robert U. Nelson Lecture
  • Kira Thurman (University of Michigan)
Moderators
  • Pheaross Graham (UCLA), Farrah O’Shea (UCLA)

What has classical music meant to Black people? Why have African Americans listened to and performed a genre of music that many Americans now consider to be white, elitist, and Eurocentric? Such accusations aren’t inaccurate: for example, African Americans represent only 1.8 percent of all orchestra musicians today. In this presentation, Professor Kira Thurman turns to the past to consider how African Americans made classical music a meaningful part of their lives. Examining the lives and careers of intellectuals such as W.E.B. DuBois and classical musicians such as Marian Anderson, Thurman argues that African Americans incorporated art music into their Black international and Black diasporic politics. Looking beyond America’s shores, they found a larger and vibrant Black history of classical music that they could also claim.

This lecture is made possible by the Joyce S. and Robert U. Nelson Fund. Robert Uriel Nelson was a revered musicologist and music professor at UCLA, who, together with his wife, established a generous endowment for the university to make programs like this possible.

The Ephemerality of Musical Hearing

March 8, 2021, 9AM-11:30AM PST

Given the ephemerality of performance, what are key issues behind the transmission of musical remembrance? How can we narrow the divide between what Diana Taylor calls the “archive” of enduring materials, such as texts, documents, and buildings, and the “more ephemeral ‘repertoire’ of embodied practice/knowledge,” such as “spoken language, dance, sports, ritual” and, we add, music performance?

Have Questions? Contact:

Holley Replogle-Wong

Panelists and Presentation titles
  • Nina Eidsheim (UCLA), “The Body as Music’s Terroir”
  • Ryan Shiotsuki (Chapman University, Cal Poly Pomona), “Stravinsky the Charlatan: Making a Mockery Out of the Virtuoso Pianist in Three Movements from Petrushka”
  • Andrea Moore (Smith College)
  • Elisabeth Le Guin (UCLA)
Link to Presentation Abstracts (PDF)
Link to Presentation Abstracts (PDF)
Link to Presentation Abstracts (PDF)

21st-Century Pianism: Retrospection, New Directions, and Interpretative Communities

April 30, 2021, 9AM-11:30AM PST

With ever-greater frequency, dedicated listeners, artists, pedagogues, and scholars tend to remark that contemporary performances of the core classical repertory sound remarkably alike in both live and recorded contexts. Considering the possibility that piano culture has entered an age of contemporary, back-and-forth reproduction, this panel considers the following: 1. To borrow from literary theorist Stanley Fish, how might a pianist navigate various “interpretative communities” of the core repertory when dealing with varying politics of taste? 2. How might a pianist listen to and theorize about past recordings to reinvigorate today’s performance approaches? 3. What are ways a pianist might introduce direct compositional changes to existing works to reboot the core performing repertory? 4. What does it mean to evaluate a performance?

Have Questions? Contact:

Holley Replogle-Wong

Panelists and Presentation titles
  • Luca Chiantore (Universidade de Aveiro INET-md), “IN-Versions: subversive musicology-based approaches to the performance of Western art music”
  • Mine Doğantan-Dack (Ensemble Luce), “Revisiting the ‘page and the stage'”
  • Pheaross Graham (UCLA), “Sonic Erasure of Subject Position in the Reception of Rachmaninoff’s Pianism: A Performance Analysis Study”
  • John Rink (University of Cambridge), “Informed listening in action–or, how might ‘knowledge’ shape how we hear and judge performances?”
  • William Kinderman (UCLA), “Revisiting Beethoven’s Piano Works: From the ‘Tempest’ Sonata to the ‘Diabelli’ Variations and Last Sonata, Op. 111”
Link to Presentation Abstracts (PDF)
Link to Presentation Abstracts (PDF)
Link to Presentation Abstracts (PDF)

Methods in Music Performance Studies

May 14, 2021, 9AM-11:30AM PST
What is music performance studies and why does it matter? With multiple ideas of what it is and what it does, music performance studies, like other rising academic fields, faces challenges in establishing clear stakes and research objectives. To identify methodologies of the field and to foster cross-disciplinary conversation on the topic of music performance, this panel brings together scholars working diversely in music theory, musicology and ethnomusicology, theater, ethnic studies and critical gender studies.
This program is co-sponsored by the UCLA Center for Performance Studies
Have Questions? Contact:

Holley Replogle-Wong

Panelists and Presentation titles
  • Amy Bauer (UCI), “Lacrimae Rerum: Locating the Body in Baroque Counterpoint”
  • Roshanak Kheshti (UCSD), “Auditioning, Performance and the Performativity of Listening in Zora Neale Hurston’s Ethnographic Archive”
  • Alejandro L. Madrid (Cornell University), “Making an Archive and Listening to It. The Performativity of Archiving/Archival Labor”
  • Richard Pettengill (Lake Forest College), “Auslander’s In Concert: A Model for Performance Analysis”
  • Co-Respondents: Mitchell Morris (UCLA), Farrah O’Shea (UCLA)
Link to Presentation Abstracts (PDF)
Link to Presentation Abstracts (PDF)
Link to Presentation Abstracts (PDF)

Performance, Gestures, Electronics

May 21, 2021, 1:00pm-3:30pm PST

Our invited panelists will present on their work in music, technology, and composition. A creative response will follow in the form of a performance of Joceyln Ho’s piece about women’s labor, and our session will conclude with a panel discussion.

Have Questions? Contact:

Holley Replogle-Wong

Presentations
  • Jocelyn Ho (UCLA), Margaret Schedel (Stony Brook University), “Women’s Labor: Building Musical Instruments from Domestic Tools”
  • Patricia Alessandrini (Stanford University), “Parlour Sounds: working towards a cyberfeminist theory of music technology through a critical compositional process”
  • Pamela Z, “Surely you Gesture”
Performance
  • Jocelyn Ho, “Women’s Labor”
Panel Discussion
  • Jocelyn Ho, Margaret Schedel, Patricia Alessandrini, Pamela Z
Link to Presentation Abstracts (PDF)
Link to Presentation Abstracts (PDF)
Link to Presentation Abstracts (PDF)

Symposium Sponsors

UCLA Center for Musical Humanities and the Joyce S. and Robert U. Nelson Fund

The Center for Musical Humanities is dedicated to advancing the interests of music and the humanities across the whole of UCLA, engaging its faculty, students, and surrounding communities in a series of events that will bring together scholarship, performance, and outreach.

The mission of the center is to foster the study of music within an interdisciplinary context by bringing together scholars and students in a variety of disciplines from around the nation and world to collaborate with scholars and students at UCLA and its associated communities, and to create an effective and vibrant face for the Herb Alpert School of Music by fostering public musical events inspired by its scholarly ventures, featuring faculty and students from across the school.

Established in 2006, the UCLA Arts Initiative is a collaboration between the Herb Alpert School of Music, the humanities division in the UCLA College, the School of the Arts and Architecture, and the School of Theater, Film and Television, with support from the offices of the provost and the vice chancellor for research.

The Center for Performance Studies (CPS) was founded in 2005 with the support from the Deans of the School of Theater, Film, and Television, the School of Arts and Architecture, the College of the Humanities, and the Office of the Executive Vice Chancellor. With Sue-Ellen Case as the founding director, CPS has explored performance as an organizing concept for thinking about the performed nature of gender, race, and sexuality. Through guest lectures, conferences, and performances, CPS has built ties with the departments of Theater, Film, Anthropology, Design, Art History, Musicology, Ethnomusicology, Gender Studies, World Arts and Cultures, English, French, German, and Comparative Literature. It also created alliances with various centers at UCLA and the Hemispheric Institute of Performance and Politics.

CPS now turns its eyes to the world through an exploration of global encounters through research, performance, and community building. By launching a new set of initiatives—professional workshops, publication projects, a writing support group, and student showcases—CPS hopes to support global and comparative approaches to performance studies as a way to chart out the new frontier of this constantly-morphing field. CPS will engage with an interdisciplinary cohort of faculty, students, and artists to establish new paradigms for performance research.

 

The American Society for Theatre Research (ASTR) is a U.S.-based professional organization that fosters scholarship on worldwide theatre and performance, both historical and contemporary. Members of the American Society for Theatre Research say the Society is a space to share scholarship and a home for networking within the profession. ASTR also sponsors or coordinates several awards, grants, fellowships, and prizes to support and recognize outstanding scholarship in theatre and performance studies.

Musicologists study the history, cultural contexts, and interpretation of music. While the discipline has tended, historically, to focus largely on European art-music repertories, in recent decades it has expanded to include many other traditions as well as other regions. The Department of Musicology at UCLA now leads the field nationally and internationally in offering advanced training within this broader vision of the discipline and is a recognized leader in the study of popular music, the study of music, power, and difference, and in innovative approaches to the study of traditional repertories and musical practices.

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