Indo-Persian

Musical Confluence:

a program of online events, 2020-21

Image:Afghan legendary singer, Ustad Mohammad Hussain Sarāhang (1924–1983), at India’s oldest music festival, the Harvallabh Music Festival, in Jalandhar, Panjab (India), December 1969, accompanied by the renowned master of the sarangi, Ustad Sabri Khan (1927–2015) sitting on his left. Image © Daniel M. Neuman

 

Kayhan Kalhor and Shujaat Hussain Khan
Kayhan Kalhor and Shujaat Hussain Khan
A Realm of Connected Histories & Creativity

The Indo-Persian Musical Confluence Symposium presents a series of performances, workshops, and presentations by academics, independent scholars, musicians and artists whose work relates to Indo-Persian musical cultures, including the Indian subcontinent, Central Asia and Iran.

This collective exploration of the Indo-Persian musical exchange aims to give new prominence to its contemporary legacy, while enhancing musical relationships, collaborations, and comparative research.

Registration for Spring Quarter Events Coming Soon

Symposium Description

The sitar and setar are the foremost classical instruments of India and Iran. They are seen by most people as being distinct instruments from different countries and traditions. However, they share a common ancestry, and their name is in fact the same word (Persian, سه­تار). It was transliterated into English in slightly different ways during colonial times. As we scratch just beneath the deceptive surface of Indian and Iranian music, we find the rich confluence that is the Indo-Persian world, a realm of connected histories and creativity, and a space to imagine new ones.

Full Event Description, References, and CFP (submissions closed)
Full Event Description, References, and CFP (submissions closed)
Full Event Description, References, and CFP (submissions closed)

Indo-Persian Musical Confluence in the Qawwali Tradition

February 28, 2021, 10AM PST

Our fifth panel in the series explores Indo-Persian musical confluence in Sufi music from Pakistan and India known as Qawwali.

Video for this event is now available at Archive.org: https://archive.org/details/calauem_200201_omvf0000127_ac

Have Questions? Contact:

Mohsen Mohammadi,
Symposium Coordinator

Panelists

Wajiha Naqvi (singer/scholar, Karachi, Pakistan)
Dhruv Sangari (singer/scholar, Delhi, India)
Shahwar Kibria Maqfi (UCLA)

Chair and Discussant

Peter Manuel (CUNY)

Performance

Saami Brothers Qawall

Indo-Persian Musical Confluence: From Tajikistan to Gujarat

February 21, 2021, 10AM PST

This event brings together international scholars discussing Indo-Persian musical hybrids in four different musical traditions within current geographical borders of Afghanistan and Pakistan/Iran.

Have Questions? Contact:

Mohsen Mohammadi,
Symposium Coordinator

Panelists

Mejgan Massoumi (Stanford University)
Ariane Zevaco (CNRS, France)
Jean During (CNRS, France)
Brian Bond (CUNY)

Chair and Moderator

George Mürer (CUNY)

Recorded Musical Presentation

Essaq Baloch accompanied by Ali-Mohammad (Aliok) Baloch (saruz, fiddle), Abdulrahman Surizehi (benju, keyboard zither), Musa Baloch (tanburag, lute); Humanoon Mobaraki (Mobikey Productions)

Link to recording of this event: https://archive.org/details/calauem_200201_omvf0000120_ac

This event is made possible thanks to:

Mohindar Brar Sambhi Chair in Indian Music at The UCLA Herb Alpert School of Music

Established in 2005, the Mohindar Brar Sambhi Chair in Indian Music at The Herb Alpert School of Music supports the performance, study and teaching of the music of India in the UCLA Department of Ethnomusicology. The Indian Music Ensembles focus on the performance of Indian classical music on the sitar and tabla.

The UCLA Department of Ethnomusicology, the largest and first of its kind in a U.S. university, offers courses that cover the music of virtually every region of the world and of many ethnic groups in the U.S., as well as courses on popular music and film music. Ethnomusicology involves the study of all kinds of music from all over the world, using a variety of disciplinary perspectives.

The Center for Musical Humanities is dedicated to advancing the interests of music and the humanities across the whole of UCLA, engaging its faculty, students, and surrounding communities in a series of events that will bring together scholarship, performance, and outreach.

The mission of the center is to foster the study of music within an interdisciplinary context by bringing together scholars and students in a variety of disciplines from around the nation and world to collaborate with scholars and students at UCLA and its associated communities, and to create an effective and vibrant face for the Herb Alpert School of Music by fostering public musical events inspired by its scholarly ventures, featuring faculty and students from across the school.

The UCLA Jahangir and Eleanor Amuzegar Chair in Iranian Studies is the director of the UCLA’s Iranian Studies program, the home to the largest and most comprehensive doctoral program of its kind in the Americas and is the only one to cover the entire spectrum of Iranian Studies across disciplines, linguistic boundaries and periods. Its distinctive strengths are Old and Middle Iranian philology, ancient Iranian history and religions, archaeology, and the study of classical Persian literature.

The program of Iranian Studies at UCLA, established half a century ago, in 1963, is the largest and most comprehensive doctoral program of its kind in the Americas. It covers the entire spectrum of Iranian studies across disciplines, linguistic boundaries, and periods. Among its distinctive strengths is the focus on Old and Middle Iranian philology, ancient Iranian history and religions, archaeology, as well as the study of classical and modern Persian literature. In addition, courses in Judeo-Persian literature and Baha’i history and religion are regularly read in the program.

The UCLA Center for India and South Asia (CISA) supports research, hosts public lectures and workshops, and collaborates with other institutions and centers to raise the profile of South Asia on campus and, more generally, in Southern California. The center’s goal is to transform UCLA into one of the leading poles of integrated research activity on India and South Asia in the country through research, collaboration, and academic integration.

For over half a century, the Center for Near Eastern Studies has promoted the interdisciplinary study of the Middle East at UCLA and beyond, raising public awareness of the region’s diverse peoples and cultures and their relevance to today’s world.

The UCLA Center for Near Eastern Studies is one of the country’s oldest organized research centers for study of the Middle East and North Africa. Since 1957 we have furthered interdisciplinary understanding of the region through conferences, symposia, lectures, scholarly research, teacher workshops, partnerships with area schools and colleges, public programs, language training, and supporting graduate and undergraduate instruction.