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Nefesh Mountain: Bluegrass, Newgrass, Jewgrass

Feb 29 Sat
7:30pm
$25 General, $10 TIOH members and UCLA students, staff & faculty
world-music
Nefesh Mountain: Bluegrass, Newgrass, Jewgrass
Temple Israel of Hollywood

“Refreshingly eclectic.” —Rolling Stone

“The music is perfection… Outstanding bluegrass from New York natives tracked in Nashville with a veritable all-star backing band.” —The Journal of Roots Music: No Depression

Nefesh Mountain is the place where Bluegrass, Old-Time, and American Roots music meet with Jewish heritage and tradition - a perfect entree to the UCLA American Jewish Music Festival: Music Crossing Boundaries. Creators, band leaders and husband and wife team Doni Zasloff and Eric Lindberg are the heart of this eclectic offering, pioneering a new world of American culture that seamlessly blends their deep love for American and Western musical forms with their own cultural backgrounds as Jewish Americans.

The result of this unexpected and beautiful mix is staggering, and alongside band members Alan Grubner (fiddle), David Goldenberg (mandolin) and Max Johnson (bass), is adept with the string virtuosity and through composed arrangements of a modern folk/bluegrass band with songs of the heart and sense of diversity, oneness, and purpose for our world today.

This performance is co-presented by the Lowell Milken Fund for American Jewish Music at the UCLA Herb Alpert School of Music and TIOH Arts & Culture as a special pre-festival concert for the UCLA American Jewish Music Festival: Music Crossing Boundaries.

This performance is made possible by the Lowell Milken Fund for American Jewish Music at the UCLA Herb Alpert School of Music. It is co-presented with the TIOH Arts & Culture.

JOIN US FOR MORE AMAZING MUSIC ON SUNDAY, MARCH 1, 2020 FOR THE UCLA AMERICAN JEWISH MUSIC FESTIVAL: MUSIC CROSSING BOUNDARIES. CLICK HERE TO PURCHASE FESTIVAL TICKETS AND TO LEARN MORE.

Purchase tickets via TIOH Arts & Culture

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